Posts Tagged "legal education"

IDIA – Look Back 2016

By on Dec 31, 2016 in Blog | 1 comment

IDIA – Look Back 2016

2016 was our biggest year yet. We want to thank everyone who made it possible. Here’s a look back at the year!

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Arodhum selects first year law student Dharu Ram as Arodhum Scholar 2016

By on Dec 27, 2016 in Blog | 0 comments

Arodhum selects first year law student Dharu Ram as Arodhum Scholar 2016

Arodhum awards scholarships to deserving rural students who demonstrate laudable strength or skill in a field, and show great potential to be agents of change. It has selected IDIA scholar, Dharu Ram as Arodhum Scholar 2016. Dharu, hails from a village in Rajasthan, and wants to fight for justice. Read his story and about Arodhum scholarship that provides opportunity and resources to bridge inequality.

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Jitholi Report (9th November, 2012 & 23rd December, 2012)

By on Dec 31, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Jitholi Report (9th November, 2012 & 23rd December, 2012)

9th November, 2012: A team comprising of Diptoshree Basu, Shivain Vaidialingam, Purushottam Anand and Shanta Chirravuri visited Jitholi along with Gayatri Bedi and Madhav Rao, representatives of General Electric (GE), on 9th November, 2012. As always, Prof. M.P. Singh accompanied us for the visit. The second and final aptitude test was conducted for the students of Kalpataru Vidyalaya. The number of students appearing for this test was significantly lower than the previous test with the number falling from 51 to 27. Also, one of the students appearing for this test had not appeared for the first aptitude test. As the students were already aware of the role IDIA plays in assisting with training for the admissions to National Law Schools, we started the session by interacting with the students to make them comfortable. The students were asked their reasons for wanting to become a lawyer. Recognising the lack of access to legal services for villagers, most of them wanted to come back to their village and provide legal assistance to anyone who needed it. After this round of interaction, we handed out the test to everyone.   The aptitude test comprised of 45 questions of 1 mark each and the duration of the test was 1 hr and 15 mins. The level of English in the test was relatively higher than the English that the students were exposed to, in the course of their regular curriculum. Because of this, extra time was given to the students to complete the test. Once the test was completed, the papers were corrected and marks for different sections were noted separately. The students were then shortlisted for an individual interaction with us. The highest score was 31 out of a total of 45. All students who secured 17 and above were called for the counselling. Out of those who secured 16, two of them were selected based on their performance in the legal aptitude section of the paper. Therefore, a total of eight students were shortlisted by the end of this process. We counselled each one of the eight students individually. All the students were informed about the role of IDIA and that they would be enrolled with LST at Meerut this year itself. The problem with most of the students seemed to be that even though they know basic English, they still lack in vocabulary and are not able to understand some words or phrases used in questions. Due to this difference in the level of English, the 12th grade and college going students were advised not to give the exam in 2013. They were instead told to focus on their boards and join/continue college next year while simultaneously preparing for the law entrance exams for 2014. Two of the students were apprehensive about being part of the programme because previously students were enrolled in IMS in Meerut which subsequently shut down and as a result their preparations were hampered. They expressed their concern over the fact that sensitisations had been conducted previously, however, no action had been taken subsequently, regarding enrolment or training. One of the students was also hesitant as his parents were against him appearing for the law entrance exam and wanted him to pursue engineering instead. After speaking with all of them and giving them sufficient time to think about their options, a follow up call was made. During the next visit to Jitholi, the team resolved to collect the income certificates of the selected candidates. In order to monitor their progress and guide them, the team decided to plan a visit to Jitholi at least twice a...

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Murshidabad Sensitisation

By on Jul 28, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Murshidabad Sensitisation

IDIA West Bengal Chapter commenced the academic year 2012-2013 by embarking on a weekend sensitisation trip to the district of Murshidabad. We had recently tied-up with Guidance Foundation, which has worked extensively in the field of children’s education in Murshidabad, and they were assisting us in this sensitisation. On Saturday, 7th of July, a team of 6- Arnab Basu, Ashutosh Shukla, Avinandan Kundu, Rishika Rangarajan, Sandra Susan Mathew and Sohini Chatterjee, left for Murshidabad. We boarded the Howrah-Malda Express at 3 pm and braced for a six hour long train journey to the erstwhile capital of the state of West Bengal. We reached our destination around 9:15 pm and were put up at the Guidance Foundation hostel. Tired from the journey,  we called it a day. The next morning, we were supposed to make our presentation to the students and sensitise them about law as a career and IDIA as an initiative which can help them. The presentation was to be held in the school hall. The sensitisation began at 11:30 am and we were pleased at the healthy turnout of around a hundred and fifty students. It began with an introductory speech by the CEO of Guidance Foundation, Mr. Haque, who introduced the six IDIA West Bengal Chapter team members to the students, teachers and parents. Following that, Arnab Basu, the Chapter Head of IDIA West Bengal, spoke to the children at length about law and IDIA. We also had a powerpoint presentation screened for the children, to make them aware about the innumerable opportunities that a career in law can throw open to them. After the speeches, we divided the crowd into three groups. One group consisted of teachers and parents. The other two groups consisted of students. Two volunteers were assigned to each group and we answered questions and cleared doubts which the students, teachers and parents had. We explained to them that another sensitisation team would be conducting an aptitude test the next week, in order to select the meritorious candidates who would finally be trained by IDIA West Bengal chapter. The students were buzzing with questions about the MCQ format, the CLAT question paper format and the various kinds of law they can pursue in future. The sensitisation ended with distribution of registration forms for the aptitude test to all interested candidates. This sensitisation trip was a very satisfying one. It was memorable to see the wonder etched on the faces of the children as they were told about one examination that had the potential to alter the entire course of their life. We are extremely thankful to Mr. Haque and Guidance Foundation for all the support and assistance they extended us. – Sohini Chatterjee, IDIA West...

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IDIA Sensitisation Session and Aptitude Test at Loreto Day School, Sealdah (West Bengal)

By on Aug 23, 2010 in Blog | 0 comments

The sensitization process at Loreto Day School, Sealdah stretched over a week. On the first day, 5 students of NUJS, Diptoshree, Radhika, Jhalak, Shruti and Suman visited the school to speak to the students about law as a career option and the benefits of studying at a national law school. Diptoshree began by posing some common quiz questions involving famous personalities. Then she asked them about the common link between all the answers: which was that they were all lawyers, who contributed to society in various ways. She then went ahead to explain the purpose of our visit and the evolution of law as a career in India. She elaborated on the setting up of national law schools and the purpose they serve. Further, all information about a 5 year law course at different national law schools and CLAT was given, with a brief mentioning of the broad areas that are tested. Radhika took example of Barack Obama to elucidate what lawyers can do for society and how some of them become very famous. Students seemed very enthusiastic about law after the session and the teacher later informed us that all those who attended the sensitization process also wanted to appear for the aptitude test which was to be conducted during the following week. They were especially astounded after hearing about the salaries that law school graduates receive. 46 students appeared for aptitude test conducted at Loreto day school. They asked many questions pertaining to the test and about law as a career prospect. Some of their questions (pertaining to the student profile section of the question paper) were: • What external sources of parental income needs to be mentioned as monthly income on the test paper? Was it compulsory to mention it? • Why was parents’ fluency in English required? • What did ‘Legal profession’ mean? The students were given one hour to complete the test. However, since they struggled to finish by an hour, they were given another 10 minutes extra time. After that was the feedback session about the test. Majority said that the test was very confusing, though not particularly difficult. They found the test to be quite lengthy. Logical reasoning was confusing for most however, it was also the most interesting section according to them. Relations and directions were the easiest for many. Parajumbles were difficult for almost all students. Legal reasoning also confused many of the students. The students had difficulty in applying the principles to the facts. All found the english comprehensions very easy to solve. Saurabh and Avisha solved two of the questions on ‘coding-decoding’ to demonstrate how to solve it. When asked if the information given to them regarding law as a prospective career convinced their parents, most said yes. Some said their parents were already quite supportive and encouraging about pursuing law as a career. Some however, had not spoken to their parents about pursuing law as yet. After the results were declared, most of the highest scorers turned out to be from the higher and middle income group and therefore, did not need any scholarship for studying law. The IDIA team decided to simply refer them to IMS, where they can receive training for CLAT after payment of requisite charges. 4 students from lower income group were selected for scholarship. Two of them belonged to SC category and one was from a minority community. The IDIA team will be visiting the school again, for verification of the income level of selected students from salary statement of parents. They will engage in a counseling session with the parents to...

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